Poetry and Translation with Anna Yin, I am nobody, 星子有话说– 诗歌创作和翻译漫谈

湖畔沙龙:诗歌创作和翻译公众讲座 (7月17日, 2021)
主讲诗人:星子安娜 主持: 诗人古土。
分享加拿大双语诗歌创作/出版/翻译等经验以及有关轶事。

Hu Pan School invited Anna Yin to share her processes of writing poetry and translating poetry. Host: Poet Gu Tu (诗人古土)Speaker: Anna Yin (Language : Chinese)

George Elliott Clarke Presents 5 Poets Breaking into Song

A night with poetry, music and songs by 5 poets, 4 composers and 2 singers with former Canadian Poet Laureate and wide audience!

The Poets: Ayesha ChatterjeeGiovanna Riccio, Lisa Richter, Andrea  Thompson, Anna Yin

The Composers, Singers, & Pianist: Emily HiemstraDavid Jaeger, Juliet Palmer, James Rolfe, Karen Usha, Gao Yuan, Mark Harry,

Hosts: George Elliott Clarke and Yang Wang (May 14, 2021)

Thank Sponsors: George Elliott Clarke, League of Canadian Poets, East and West Learning Connections.

Read the beautiful summary by George Elliott Clarke

Comments from others

Histrionics: A Medley of Haiku and Haibun–Review by Patrick Connors

Review by Patrick Connors

One has to appreciate the wry sense of humor in the title of Hans Jongman’s latest poetry collection. Histrionics are exaggerated behavior designed to attract attention. Jongman’s work is very concise and reflective, clearly the product of deep contemplation and a positive self-image.

“What I like the most about the poetry is its unpretentiousness,” said Chris Faiers. “Hans is an old master of the haiku form, so I should have expected nothing less than the best. But so many haijin have become arrogant and self-promoting these days that it’s refreshing to read a collection which isn’t trying to impress the reader, but rather presents great poetry without a lot of superficial blather.”

Jongman begins “What It Is” with a short, anecdotal essay about a trip to see his doctor. From such an everyday experience, we gain insight into the author’s reverie, and empathy for the physician. He follows the essay with this haiku:

a cold front
has cleared my sinuses
and the waiting room

“Haibun combines prose and haiku,” Jongman explained. “The two disciplines compliment each other and equally deserve the same meticulous care for detail.

The haibun is the narrative, the story of a writer’s personal experience complemented by a haiku, or multiple haiku. The haiku should not be a synopsis or reiteration of the preceding prose but should be reflective of the interrelationship between prose and the haiku. The haiku should stand on its own, on its own merit.”

“Amsterdam” begins with a minimalist yet fascinating telling of the history of Holland’s capital city. It’s very pleasant to read, and very easy to visualize, although I have never been there. But the reader is startled into a further awareness at the end:

cloudburst
a thunderclap reverberates
between the gables

“My role was to make the book more balanced, to make sure it was laid out well,” said Anna Yin, publisher of SureWay Press. “I made some recommendations with design which fit in with Hans’ family history and personal experiences.”

Yin made reference to Jongman’s homage to the masters of haiku and haibun, and how much she appreciated it. “I published this book because it is very high quality. As soon as I read the poetry, I immediately loved it.”

Jongman’s final poem of the book, titled “Covid-19”, is a fitting denouement both to this collection and the pandemic. It is a series of inter-woven haiku, done in a manner which only a master of the form could portray. I will not post any of it here, because I want you to get the book and seek it out for yourself. You will thank me later!

To order a copy of the book, please contact the author: hansjongman381@gmail.com

Thanks Chris Faiser’ Riffs & Ripples from ZenRiver Gardens for supporting.

John Robert Colombo’s letter for Tracing the True North

John Robert Colombo
42 Dell Park Avenue / Toronto M6B 2T6 / Canada
Phone 1 (416) 782 6853
E-mail jrc@colombo.ca
Webpage www.colombo.ca

19 May 2021

Dear Anna Yin and Terry Barker:

Many thanks are due to the two of you for drawing my attention to Tracking the True North, the reading of which gave me great pleasure, that of reminding me of what I already knew and of introducing me to what was new to me.

SureWay Press has produced an agreeably informative text and a volume that has the distinguishing characteristics of being two essays and indeed two texts in one – a detailed and exact narrative about conceptions about the “lost past” and a wealth of commentaries on ever-present (albeit hard-to-find) source materials.

I am sorry you did not notice in passing Colombo’s All Time Great Canadian Quotations (1994), which has hundreds of chronologically arranged quotations, the first of which begins in 1,000 B.C. (from the Vedas) and the last to A.D. 1995 with Judith Merril embracing the vision of the Voyager Interstellar Record then approaching outer space. There is also is the “Polar World / Tropical Valley” section of the final thirty pages of Mysterious Canada (1988) which covers some of your material from highly imaginative and conceptual perspectives including the Theosophical one.

The author has done an amazing amount of reading and has bravely embraced the imaginative and intuitive dimensions of human desire, illusion, knowledge, history, hope, and achievement. It puts “Canadian” history in the widest of possible perspectives. I hope Tracking the True North sets the compasses of young readers spinning and awakens their sense that history is a story that may indeed be true.

Congratulations,

JRC